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Cherry Recovery Shake

 

Cherry Recovery Shake 2

Talk about a power shake! This post workout lifesaver is full of body repairing nutrients that are bound to get you on your feet in no time. As you know, exercise should be a part of your normal routine. But did you know supplying your muscles with ample nutrients is just as important? Do you even know what nutrients your muscles need?

We need to take in several minerals, amino acids, and vitamins in order to repair, recover and grow muscle tissue. If you are lacking in this department then you will not see the growth you want. Whether your goal is to define, shred, or build muscle tissue; your muscles need the same nutrients just in different quantities and times. But let’s not get too complex. Below are some of the required nutrients needed for muscle health and the good news is you can find them in this shake:

  • Cacao is full of magnesium, which plays a number of roles in the body. It is required for more than 325 enzymatic reactions. Some include: fat synthesis, protein and nucleic acids, neurological activity, muscular contraction and relaxation, cardiac activity and bone metabolism. It is also necessary to make ATP, your body’s energy currency.
  • Chia seeds are a great source of omega-3 essential fatty acids as well as minerals and antioxidants. Increased omega-3 concentrations in the blood are associated with decreased levels of pro-inflammatory markers.
  • Cherries are full of vitamin C, fiber and antioxidants. Researchers believe that tart cherries’ antioxidants protect against attacks by exercise-induced free radicals, which can lead to painful inflammation. The anthocyanins (antioxidants responsible for red, purple or blue pigments in fruit/veggies) activate a molecule that helps rev up fat burning and decrease fat storage.
  • Branched chained amino acids (BCAAs) are a group of three essential amino acids: l-leucine, l-valine, and l-isoleucine. An essential amino acid (there are nine of them) is any amino acid that can’t be manufactured by the body naturally, meaning that they have to come from protein intake. BCAAs are the only amino acids metabolized inside of the muscle itself (all of the others are metabolized in the liver), and make up about 35% of muscle tissue. They are necessary for the development and maintenance of muscle tissue.
  • L-glutamine is a non-essential amino acid, that we obtain through food and we also make it internally. However, sometimes we need to supplement with L-glutamine since it is so widely used in the body and we often deplete our stores. L-glutamine is needed for brain, digestive and immune health as well as removing waste products from the bloodstream. L-glutamine also plays a major role in helping your muscles repair themselves after stress as it brings nitrogen to your muscles to stimulate muscle repair. 
  • Oats help to replenish muscle glycogen, your muscles main energy source. During hard bouts of exercise our muscles deplete glycogen so it is critical to replenish the source for your next workout. Eating quickly digested carbohydrates spikes insulin and gets amino acids into your cells (which is what you want). Oats have fiber, minerals, and vitamins a nice super food!
  • Your muscles are primarily made up of amino acids which are the building blocks of proteins. During exercise, you tear down your muscles so that they can become bigger and stronger. This happens in a process called muscle protein synthesis. In order for protein synthesis to occur, you need protein.

Ingredients:

  • 1 c. tart cherry juice, organicCherry Recovery Sake
  • ½ c. frozen dark cherries, organic
  • 1 T cacao
  • 1 scoop branched chained amino acids
  • 1 scoop glutamine or 5g
  • 1 T chia seeds
  • ¼ c. quick oats or oat bran, GF
  • 3 ice cubes
  • 1 sc. protein

Directions:

  1. Blend all ingredients except protein. Pulse in protein.
  2. Sip slowly and enjoy.

Energy Shake

Peanut-Butter-Banana-Shake-510x510

Smoothies make for the best breakfasts. If you’re pressed for time in the AM, add the ingredients to your blender the night before. This smoothie is also a great pre-workout snack. Cacao powder is full of energy boosting minerals bound to help you pump out that last rep. Healthy fat and protein are a power duo that will keep you satiated longer. I recommend consuming about 60-90 minutes prior to hitting the weights.

Ingredients

Makes 1 serving

  • 1 tbsp 100% pure cacao powder
  • 1 tbsp nut butter, look for no sugar added just nuts!
  • 1/2 medium ripe banana
  • 1/2 c. 0% Greek yogurt or goat yogurt, if dairy free use water***
  • 2-3 ice cubes
  • 1 tsp of cinnamon
  • Dash of nutmeg
  • 1 scoop of protein

Directions

  1. Add nut butter, cocoa powder, Greek yogurt (or water) and ice cubes into blender and mix at high speed.
  2. Slice banana, add into mixture, and re-blend.
  3. Lastly pulse in your protien powder.

Nutrition Facts

Calories- 353
Total Fat- 10g
Total Carbohydrates- 33g
Total Fiber- 6g
Total Sugars- 17g
Protein- 32g

Key Lime Pie Smoothie

I was delighted to see this recipe in the January edition of Oxygen Magazine. This zesty recipe took my mind away from the dreary SF weather and into the tropics. The combo of healthy fat and antioxidants makes this shake a superfood. Not only will the healthy fat keep you satiated but it will also help keep your body healthy from the inside out. Bonus: avocados are rich in glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that helps the body repair on a cellular level, boost the immune system and detoxify toxins. You might think avocado is a nasty edition but surprisingly it adds a silky texture. Enjoy this shake for breakfast to get your day started with your best foot forward.

key-lime-shake-1

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 avocado
  • 2 tsp lime zest
  • Juice of one lime
  • 1 cup plain unsweetened almond or hemp milk
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder
  • 1 handful of ice cubes
  • optional: 1-2 tbsp of xylitol

Directions:

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender, leaving out the whey protein powder, and blend thoroughly.
  2. Pulse in whey protein.
Nutrition Facts:

Calories: 350
Total Fats: 21 g
Saturated Fat: 4 g
Cholesterol: 35 mg
Sodium: 230 mg
Total Carbohydrates: 22 g
Dietary Fiber: 8 g
Sugars: 5 g
Protein: 25 g
Iron: 2 mg

Mood Booster

It’s a double whammy- this shake is considered a mood booster and fat blaster due to its synergistic ingredients! Stress can deplete your body’s levels of B vitamins and cantaloupe is packed with B6 and B3, natural anxiety reducers. Whey protein is rich in the amino acid tryptophan which has been shown to enhance cognitive performance during times of stress. Lastly, figure friendly almonds are rich in the energy boosting nutrients manganese, copper, and riboflavin.
Makes one serving

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup plain or vanilla yogurt (use coconut yogurt if dairy free)
  • ¼ cup chopped cantaloupe
  • ¼ cup blackberries
  • ½ banana
  • 1 tbsp ground almonds
  • 2-4 ice cubes
  • 1 tsp raw honey or xylitol, optional
  • 1 scoop whey protein powder

Directions:

  1. Mix all ingredients, except whey powder. Mix thoroughly or until desired consistency is reached.
  2. Pulse in whey. Enjoy!

 

 

 

Nutrition Facts:
Calories: 330
Total Fat: 7 g
Saturated Fat: 3g
Sodium: 140mg
Total Carbohydrates: 39g
Dietary Fiber: 5g
Sugar: 27 g
Protein: 30g

Tropic Thunder Smoothie

This smoothie is absolutely delicious! Enjoy it first thing in the morning or after a long workout.

What you’ll need:

  • ½ cup pineapple chunks, frozen or fresh
  • 1 cup coconut water
  • ¼ cup tart cherries, pitted, frozen or fresh
  • ½ peeled banana, sliced
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 scoop vanilla whey protein powder

Place all ingredients into the blender, except whey and combine until desired consistency is reached. Lastly, pulse in whey protein powder. Enjoy!

Pineapple-
This is a fabulous fruit is juicy, sweet and full of the digestive enzyme, bromelain. Bromelain aides in digestion, reduces inflammation, inhibits appetite and enhances wound healing. Pineapple is an excellent source of manganese, an important cofactor in energy production and antioxidant defenses. It is also very high in vitamin C.

Coconut water-
In one cup of coconut water, you will find 600 mg of potassium, 60mg of magnesium, 250mg of sodium, 58 mg of calcium and a trace amount of zinc. Making it a potent electrolyte enhancer. After strenuous exercise it is important to replace the electrolytes that have been lost through sweat. It can help prevent muscle soreness, cramping and dehydration.

Cherries-
Cherries are a low calorie delight with only 58 calories per 100 grams or a little less than ½ cup. Like pineapple, cherries are high in vitamin C and manganese. The darker the cherry the higher the antioxidant content, opt for dark versions to ensure anti-inflammatory and anti-pain properties. Cherries are also high in melatonin, a powerful antioxidant and sleep inducer.

Banana-
Though bananas are calorie and carbohydrate dense, they offer an array of nutrients. The average banana has 440 mg of potassium. Bananas help to normalize bowel function and lower cholesterol due to their high level of pectin (a type of soluble fiber), also found in apples.

Chia Seeds-
You may remember these seeds from chia pets but now they are noted as an abundant source of nutrients. This little round seed is very rich in omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants, which protect the volatile omega-3. They are high in fiber and rich in several minerals.

Whey Protein-
An amazing protein derived from milk. It contains glutamine, an amino acid superb for healing the intestines and inflammatory GI conditions. It suppresses appetite by stimulating the digestion of fat and protein. Contains leucine, an amino acid that helps body to preserve calorie-burning muscle while dieting.

References:

Burkhardt, S., D. X. Tan, L.C. Manchester, R. Hardeland, and R. J. Reiter. Detection and quantification of the antioxidant melatonin in Montmorency and balaton tart cherries (prunus cerasus). J Am Chem Soc. 2001; 49:4898-4902.

Nijveldt, R.J., E. van Nood, D.E.van Hoorn, et al. Flavonoids: A review of probable mechanisms of action and potential applications. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2001; 74:418-425.